Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘In The Kitchen’ Category

Korean Barbecued SpareribsIf barbequed ribs and Buffalo chicken wings top your list of favorite foods, you’ll love these easy Korean spareribs. Both HOT and sweet, these ribs will have you reaching for a glass of water, but only after you’ve licked your fingers clean!

Dwaeji-Galbi: Korean Barbequed Pork Ribs
Discovering Korean Cuisine: Recipes from the Best Korean Restaurants in Los Angeles, Edited by Allisa Park

INGREDIENTS
1½ pounds of pork ribs
1/2 cup Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang)
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil

DIRECTIONS
1. Put hot pepper paste, sugar, garlic, black pepper, and Asian sesame oil in a bowl. Stir to mix.

2. Chop the pork ribs between the bones. Add to the sauce and mix well.

3. For the best tasting Dwaeji-galbi, grill it over charcoal. If you don’t have a grill, you can also pan-fry it and then put it in the oven until fully cooked.

Serving size: 2

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Tubs of gochujang, Korean hot pepper paste, can be purchased in Asian markets. Be aware that it is sold in varying degrees of pepper heat. I made this recipe using a medium-hot #3 paste. The level of heat was perfect – enough heat, but not scorching. Korean gochujang

2. I purchased 3 pounds of pre-sliced packs of baby back pork ribs and doubled the sauce.

3. Because there is sugar in the sauce, the ribs can burn easily. Grill over low heat and keep an eye on them.

Enjoy!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

n-Cheese Mighty Muffins Sometimes in life, bigger is better. Imagine a muffin that’s larger than a teacup. That translates to more crunchy muffin top to enjoy and more tender muffin to savor. This recipe won’t disappoint. It’s big, versatile, and beautiful. And if you’re on the go, wrap one up and take it with you. Nothing’s better than a freshly-baked muffin to munch on while you’re in transit.

Corn-Cheese Mighty Muffins
Sunset Magazine, October 1986

INGREDIENTS
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/3 cup sugar
3½ teaspoons baking powder
1 cup (4 oz.) firmly packed shredded sharp cheddar cheese
1 cup milk
1 large egg
1/4 cup (1/8 lb.) butter or margarine, melted

DIRECTIONS
1. In a large bowl, mix flour, cornmeal, sugar, and baking powder.

2. Reserve 2 tablespoons of cheese: stir remaining cheese into flour mixture.

3. Form a well in center of flour mixture.

4. In a small bowl, beat to blend milk, egg, and butter; pour into well in flour mixture. Stir just until lightly blended; batter should be lumpy.

5. Spoon batter equally into 4 greased 6-ounce custard cups (set cups at least 2 inches apart on a shallow baking pan) or 6 greased muffin cups 2½ to 2¾ inches in diameter (fill alternate muffin cups); cups will be heaping full.

6. Sprinkle reserved cheese evenly over muffins.

7. Bake filled custard cups in a 375°F oven, filled muffin cups in a 400° oven, until browned and a slender wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes for custard cup-size muffins, 25 to 30 minutes for smaller ones.

8. Let cool about 5 minutes. Remove muffins from cups or pans and serve hot or warm.

Makes 4 mighty or 6 large muffins.

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. The sprinkling of cheddar cheese on top gives these muffins an extra nice crunch.

2. I added some finely minced ham (leftover from Easter) into the batter just after adding the liquid components. This is a versatile recipe: you could also add corn kernels, chopped green chilies, or even bacon. Take some creative liberty!

3. Do not over-stir the batter. It’s okay for the batter to have lumps. Too much stirring overdevelops the gluten in the flour which can result in tough and rubbery muffins.

4. Grease the top rims of the custard cups or muffin tins. This will help the muffins release more easily from the cups, especially as they rise and bake over the edges.

5. All ovens vary in temperature and heat distribution. Be careful not to over bake muffins or else they will be dry.

Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

Blueberry Tamari Greens Bowl A bowl of salad should contain wholesome and healthy ingredients. Not all do. With spinach, tofu, almonds, blueberries, and cucumbers as its primary ingredients, this Asian-inspired salad is loaded with nutrients and exotic flavors. Plus, this recipe is actually three recipes in one: a salad with salad dressing, Lemongrass Tofu, and 5-Spice Tamari Almonds. All the parts are wonderfully versatile and will enliven your ho-hum salad repertoire.

Blueberry Tamari Greens Bowl
Recipe from Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romeo

INGREDIENTS
For the Salad
1 pint blueberries
3 Persian cucumbers, diced into 1/2-inch cubes
2 scallions, green parts only, thinly sliced
4 cups baby spinach, washed and spun dry
3 tablespoons tamari
1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 cup 5-Spice Tamari Almonds (recipe below)
Lemongrass Tofu, chopped into 1-inch cubes (recipe below)

For the Lemongrass Tofu
1 pound extra-firm tofu or super-firm tofu (no pressing needed)
2 tablespoons maple syrup
4 teaspoons tamari
1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped fresh lemongrass
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons peanut oil or olive oil

For the 5-Spice Tamari Almonds
1½ cups raw whole almonds, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons dark agave nectar
3 tablespoons tamari
2 teaspoons Chinese 5-spice powder
About 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt (such as Maldon)

DIRECTIONS
For the Salad
1. Place the blueberries, cucumbers, scallions, and greens in a large salad bowl.

2. In a glass measuring cup or bowl, whisk together the tamari, maple syrup, sesame oil, sesame seeds, ginger, and red pepper.

3. Pour the dressing over the salad, toss to coat, and divide among serving bowls. Top with almonds and tofu, if using, and serve.

Serves 2

For the Lemongrass Tofu
1. If using extra-firm tofu, press the tofu first:
A. Slice 1 pound of tofu in half and slice each half again. Slice each remaining piece in half for a total of 8 slabs of tofu of equal thickness.slicing tofu

B. Layer a large cutting board with clean towels or paper towels. Arrange the tofu slices in a single layer on the towel.tofu slices

C. Spread another towel over the tofu, and then press another cutting board on top of the towel. Stack a few heavy things on the cutting board: cans, cast-iron pans, 300-page cookbooks, etc.Pressing tofu

D. Press tofu for 20 minutes, or up to an hour. Tofu will ooze water, so it’s best to arrange this near a sink, propped on a slight angle on the edge of the sink to drain.

2. Slice the pressed tofu into thin 1/4-inch strips.

3. Preheat the oven to 400° F and coat the bottom and sides of a 13 x 9-inch ceramic or glass baking dish with cooking spray.

4. Combine the maple syrup, tamari, lemongrass, garlic, and oil in the baking dish and whisk together. Arrange the tofu slices in the marinade and set aside while the oven is preheating, about 15 minutes. Occasionally stir the tofu strips.Marinating pressed tofu

5. Bake the tofu for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and flip the strips over. Bake another 15 to 20 minutes, until the strips are golden and the marinade is absorbed.IMG_2433

6. Serve warm or chilled. Store chilled and consume within 2 days for best flavor.

Serves 2 as a salad topping

For the 5-Spice Tamari Almonds
1. Preheat the oven to 325° F.

2. In a 13 x 9-inch metal or ceramic baking dish, combine the almonds, agave, tamari, and 5-spice powder. Stir until the nuts are completely coated. Sprinkle with salt.

3. Roast the nuts for 16 to 18 minutes, stirring occasionally, until a sticky glaze forms. Remove from the oven and immediately transfer the nuts to a lightly oiled sheet of parchment paper or aluminum foil, and use a fork to break apart any clumps of nuts.

4. Once completely cool, store the nuts in a tightly covered container. Use within 2 weeks.

Makes 1½ cups

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Chinese 5-spice powder is a blend of star anise, cinnamon, fennel, cloves, and Sichuan pepper. Jars of it can be found in the spice aisle of Asian markets.

2. Tamari is a Japanese soy sauce. If you follow a gluten-free diet, look for bottles of tamari that are wheat-free/gluten-free.

3. Save yourself a step and purchase pre-toasted sesame seeds at your Asian market.

4. I made the 5-Spice Tamari Almonds, the salad dressing, and the Lemongrass Tofu the day before serving.

5. My Lemongrass Tofu had absorbed the marinade and was golden-dark brown by the end of the first 20 minute cook time.

6. I felt that making the nuts not only added work, but also an added another tamari-flavored ingredient. The next time I make this salad, I will add freshly toasted plain almond pieces to the salad.

7. I added a splash of rice vinegar to the salad dressing, because I felt like it needed it.

8. Do not toss the salad with all of dressing. You will only need a fraction of the dressing or it will overwhelm the other ingredients. Keep in mind, also, that all the ingredients will take on the color of the dressing.

Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

Remembrance Box The woodworker stood back and looked at his project. While pouring his heart into the design and construction of it, his mind focused on only one thing – the purpose of it. At a recent meeting of local woodcrafters, a plea had been made for boxes. Keaton Raphael Memorial, a nonprofit organization that assists families with children with cancer, was in dire need of woodworkers to help make Remembrance Boxes. When a child being helped by Keaton Raphael Memorial passes away and becomes a special KRM angel, the organization gives the family a wooden box containing bereavement reading materials and oftentimes a grant to help with funeral expenses. The woodworker rose to the challenge and his expertly-crafted work reflects the beauty of fallen leaves, signifying, in my opinion, the short, but significant lives of young souls.

#1 – Land Art
Land Art Nature doesn’t need any embellishments. However, when man works with natural components, interesting art can result. You will be impressed by the scale of some of the projects in 21 Unforgettable Examples of Land Art.

#2 – Got Stuff?
Recycling Goods With children moving hither and yon, I am left with a garage full of “stuff.” All of it is useful – to somebody. Rather than toss everything into the garbage, I’d rather find new homes or new uses for them. If you are in the same situation of having stuff and not wanting to add to our landfills, go to earth911. Type in what you would like to recycle, add your zipcode, and a listing of local recycling centers should appear.

#3 – Easter Decorations
80 Fabulous Easter Decorations While scrolling through the ideas in 80 Fabulous Easter Decorations You Can Make Yourself, I went into creative overload. There are so many cute and clever ideas in it, I don’t which project to start first!

#4 – Fresh Eggs
How to Buy the Freshest Eggs PossibleWith Easter right around the corner, you’ll want to make sure you buy the freshest eggs possible. In How to Buy the Freshest Eggs Possible, learn how to read the Julian date on an egg carton. And here’s a tip from me: when selecting a carton of eggs in the grocery store, just don’t open the carton and look at the eggs. Always wiggle each egg. If an egg doesn’t move, there’s a good chance that its shell is cracked, causing it to stick to the carton.

#5 – In Every Falling Leaf
“In every change, in every falling leaf there is some pain, some beauty. And that’s the way new leaves grow.”
Amit Ray

Note: The beautiful Remembrance Box in the photo was made by Mr. Jim Hunt

Now go and spread joy!

Read Full Post »

Felt Baby Shoes “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Reading this six-word piece of flash fiction, purportedly penned by author Ernest Hemingway, always made me feel sad. Like other people, I wondered about the tragic tale and about the fate of the baby. Now, I know of a plausible good ending to the story. A month ago, I decided to sew shoes for my infant granddaughter. I worked on them sporadically throughout the month, as there never seemed to be enough time to sit down for more than five minutes. By the time I finally finished embroidering the last of the three pairs and tried them on Charlotte, they were too small. Babies’ feet grow all too quickly. Alas, I have baby shoes for sale, never worn.

#1 – Workspaces of the Famous
Inspiring Workspaces of the Famously Creative Some people think that Ernest Hemingway wrote the six-word story while he was at lunch with friends and not in his office. Was he that much of a literary genius to produce incredible work just anywhere? Where do you do your best creative work and what does your creative space look like? Check out these Inspiring Workspaces of the Famously Creative and see if your workspace more closely resembles that of Georgia O’Keefe or that of Alexander Calder.

#2 – Six Things
Throw a Six Quote Hemingway’s six words provoked much thought. Here are six quotes about “six things” that will certainly inspire you at least six times over:
Six Things Go Unsaid Quote

Tom Hopkins: Six Things

Arabic Quote: Six Things

Eddie Rickenbacker quote

Lewis Carroll: Six Impossible Things Quote

Marcus Tullius Cicero: Six Things

#3 – Toast, Anyone?
Creative Breakfast Toasts If you wake up at 6:00 in the morning and are looking for an energy-boosting breakfast, look no further. Here are 21 Energy-Boosting Breakfast Toasts. They all look good to me!

#4 – Six Innovations
Interview with Steven Johnson: Six Innovations that Made the Modern World If you had to name six innovations that made the modern world, what would they be? Author Steven Johnson did that in his book “How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World” and for the accompanying PBS television series. He interviewed last year with SFGate to discuss how he “traveled the globe to tell the little-known stories of men and women who came up with revolutionary innovations of modern civilization.” Read about how he crawled through the sewers in San Francisco and learn more about some of the innovations he researched here.

#5 – Creativity
“Creativity is not a talent or ability. It is the fruit of a person’s decision to matter.”
Eric Maisel

Now go and spread joy!

Read Full Post »

Bavarian PretzelsOne bite into a warm homemade pretzel and I was hooked. Like so many other baked items, pretzels are so much better when they’re made from scratch. Bearing a plate of freshly-baked pretzels, my friend Miho came to visit. As I sampled a poppy seed-covered one, I was immediately impressed with its soft chewy texture. After savoring every last salty bit of it, I asked her, “How did you make this?” She replied, “It’s easy.” I laughed. She obviously wasn’t aware of the fact that I bake bread bricks. “I will show you,” she said. And that she did. She came over again and guided me through the step-by-step process of pretzel-making. With new found excitement to experiment with yeast, I’m planning to make trays and trays of these twisted wonders. Spirits “rise” when you bake with friends!

Bavarian Pretzels
Raley’s Something Extra Magazine

Prep: 30 minutes
Rise: 45 minutes
Cook: 20 minutes total

INGREDIENTS
1 cup warm water
3 tbsp. sugar
1 package Fleischmann’s Active Dry Yeast
3 to 3-1/3 cups flour, plus extra for kneading, divided
2 tbsp. baking soda
Freshly ground sea salt

DIRECTIONS
1. Place water in a large mixer bowl and sprinkle sugar and yeast over the top. Let stand for 5 minutes or until yeast starts to foam. Beat in 2 cups flour until smooth.

2. Using a dough hook, beat in remaining flour. Knead several times on a lightly floured board and place in a lightly oiled bowl; turn to coat both sides. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm spot for 30 minutes. Divide dough into 6 pieces. Roll each into a 15-inch long piece and twist into pretzel shapes. Let rise for 15 minutes.

3. Bring a large pot of water to a boil; stir in baking soda. Preheat oven to 450°F. Grease a large baking sheet and sprinkle with a few grinds of salt. Drop pretzels a few at a time into boiling water, cooking for 15 seconds on each side. Remove with a slotted spoon and place on baking sheet. Sprinkle with additional salt and bake for 10 minutes or until pretzels are golden brown.

Serves: 6

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Use coarse salt to sprinkle on the pretzels before baking.

2. Miho sprinkles poppy seed and/or sesame seeds on the pretzels prior to baking.

3. We cut the dough into 8 pieces, to make slightly smaller pretzels.

4. To shape the pretzels, Miho told me to make a loop first and then to twist the ends together and then twist them again. The twisted ends are then folded down on top of the loop.

ENJOY!

Read Full Post »

Chinese Steamed Pork Turnovers My Yin Yin, my father’s mother, calls out my name in Chinese and I drop what I am doing and run to the kitchen. I know that a fresh batch of homemade Fun Guaw, savory Chinese turnovers, have finished steaming and are waiting for me. My grandmother picks up one with a pair of chopsticks and holds it up in the air. With light coming in from behind her, I can see little bits of pork, mushroom, and water chestnut through the remarkably thin and translucent “skin.” And like a little bird waiting for a mama bird to feed her, I open my mouth. Plop! My grandmother drops a warm Fun Guaw into my mouth, and I gently bite through the tender outer layer to release its delicious contents. Fifty-two years later, I still remember how my grandmother made and fed me these delicacies. So, as an ode to her and a nod to Chinese New Year, I decided to make these wonderful little turnovers with my daughter. When the first batch came out of the steamer, I anxiously tasted one to see if it was as good as I remembered. It wasn’t as good as my Yin Yin’s, but how could it possibly compete with a childhood memory? Like Marcel Proust, though, I reveled in a moment of remembering things past.

Steamed Pork Turnovers (Fun Guaw)
Adapted from Dim Sum by Rhoda Yee

INGREDIENTS
Wheat Starch Dough
1 cup wheat starch
2/3 cup tapioca starch
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp oil
1 cup and 2 tbsp boiling water

Pork Filling
1 lb minced fresh pork butt
12 water chestnuts, minced
1 tbsp minced salted turnips (choan choy)
4 dried shiitake mushrooms
1 tbsp sugar
3/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp white pepper
1 stalk minced green onion

Sauce Mixture
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tsp light soy sauce
2 tbsp sherry
1 tbsp sugar

2 tsp oil for stir-frying

DIRECTIONS
To Make Dough:
Wheat Starch Dough
1. Mix together the first 4 ingredients in the order given.

2. Bring water to a rolling boil and stir into dry ingredients with chopsticks until dry ingredients adhere.

3. Cover and let it cool for 15 minutes.

4. Lightly oil kneading surface and knead dough for several minutes, until dough is well mixed and smooth. Now it is ready for wrapping.

5. Dough can be kept at room temperature for 1 day, if you wrap it in plastic wrap.

To Make Filling:
Pork Filling
1. Soak dried mushrooms for 1 hour or until soft. Discard stems and mince mushroom caps finely.

2. Mix sauce ingredients together in a bowl and set aside.

3. In a wok or skillet, heat 2 tsp oil and then stir-fry the pork, water chestnuts, salted turnips and mushrooms for a few minutes. Stir in seasonings (sugar, salt, and white pepper).

4. Add sauce mixture and stir into meat mixture well. (Sauce mixture is very thick.)

5. Add green onions last.

6. Let meat mixture cool before wrapping in dough.

Assembling Turnovers:
1. Divide the dough into 3 parts. Roll each part into 3/4 inch wide rolls.
Dough Rolls

2. Cut each roll into 3/4 inch wide segments.
Cutting Dough

3. Roll each segment into 4 inch rounds.

4. Place 1 tbsp of filling in the center of round and bring opposite sides together and pinch to seal. Turnovers will resemble half moons.

Steaming:
1. If using a bamboo steamer or aluminum steamer, fill the bottom layer with water and line the steam rack with a piece of parchment paper (prevents sticking).

2. If you don’t have a bamboo or aluminum steamer, set up a steamer in a large pot by putting water in the bottom and using a steamer stand or inverted heat-safe bowl. Oil a cake or pie pan to prevent turnovers from sticking.

3. Bring the water to a boil.

4. Place the turnovers in a single layer either on their sides or standing with their seam sides up in the steamer. Do not let them touch or they will stick together.

4. Steam for approximately 15 minutes. Skin should be somewhat translucent.

5. Let cool for 2 to 3 minutes before handling.

6. Serve with light soy sauce for dip.

Do Ahead Notes:
These turnovers can be kept for several days in the refrigerator or 2 to 3 weeks in the freezer. In either case, keep them well-wrapped to prevent discoloration. Reheat by steaming, 10 minutes from refrigerator or 20 minutes from freezer.

Yields about 3 dozen

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Wheat starch, tapioca starch, dried mushrooms, and salted turnip can be purchased at most Asian markets.
se Ingredients

2. I prefer rough minced pork over ground pork. That being said, I buy a piece of pork butt and mince it in my food processor.

3. Instead of 12 water chestnuts, I chopped one 8-oz can of water chestnuts.

4. My family thought the filling was a bit too salty, so I cut back on the salt in the filling by about 1/4 tsp.

5. My daughter and I had trouble rolling the balls of dough into 4 inch rounds, as the skin became too thin and difficult to work with. Ours were closer to 3 inches in diameter. Because of the size differential, we used less filling per turnover. Having a tortilla press would have been helpful.

6. My family always served these turnovers with oyster sauce instead of soy sauce.

Chinese Steamed Pork Turnovers

Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: