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Posts Tagged ‘separating eggs’

It’s that time of the year – almost every shopping cart in the grocery store has a carton of eggs in it! Here are a few egg-ceedingly good tips and egg-cerpts about eggs that you might want to eggs-plore:

#1 – Eggs-cruciating
I’ve seen women at grocery stores go to excruciating lengths to get the perfect dozen eggs. They’ll move eggs from one carton to another until they have the desired combination. When you purchase a carton of eggs, always open the carton to visually inspect the condition of the eggs. But take your inspection one step further – while the lid is open, wiggle each egg in its spot. If an egg does not move, chances are it’s cracked underneath and the leaked egg has glued the shell to the carton. I don’t remember where I learned this tip, but I’ve used it for many years and have never come home with any “bad” eggs!

#2 – Eggs-cellent
If you are unsure about the freshness of the eggs in your refrigerator, put them in some water and see how they behave. What’s Cooking America has this to say about egg freshness:  Generally fresh eggs will lie on the bottom of the bowl of water. Eggs that tilt so that the large end is up are older, and eggs that float are rotten. The tilting is caused by air pockets in the eggs that increase in size over time as fluid evaporates through the porous shell and oxygen and gases filter in. The older an egg gets the more the gas builds up inside it. More gas = more floating!

#3 – Eggs-actly
To cook eggs exactly the way you like them, you need to take into account not just the length of cooking time, but also the size of the eggs you’re using. What’s Cooking America comes to the rescue again with this article and cooking guide, so that your eggs are perfectly cooked every time.

#4 – Eggs-tricate
Peeling hard boiled eggs is sometimes easy and sometimes frustrating. Often times it requires extricating bits of shell or membrane stuck to the egg. According to an article on Chef 2 Chef, The fresher the egg, the harder it is to peel – no matter how you cook it. A two week old refrigerated egg will peel beautifully for you once cooked, while an egg fresh from the chicken could be your worst nightmare.

#5 – Eggs-samples
Getting bored with hard boiled eggs? Go to Endless Simmer and check out 100 Ways to Cook an Egg.

#6 – Eggs-asperating
It can be exasperating when a recipe calls for separating an egg and you’ve managed to crack the egg shell into little pieces, or worst, you’ve broken the yolk sac. Here’s a handy little tip that makes the whole process easier: Carefully break an egg into a funnel. The egg whites will slide through the funnel, but the egg yolk will be left behind. Larger pieces of egg shell will be unable to get through the funnel, too!

Hope you enjoyed my “eggs-citing” tips!

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