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Corned Beef Potato Salad Take the usual St. Patrick’s Day fare and serve it up with a new twist. Toss corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes together with a few other ingredients and a homemade dressing and you have a potato salad good enough to catch a leprechaun. Every now and then, while searching for a recipe, I come across two similar recipes and can’t decide which one to try. This recently happened with two corned beef potato salad recipes, so I decided to do a head-to-head taste test. The recipes are much the same, but with a few interesting differences. One recipe uses horseradish and mustard for kick and the other recipe gets additional flavor boosts from celery and mustard seeds. One recipe uses sauerkraut and the other uses freshly shredded cabbage. Subtle, but distinct differences. I liked them both. I say po-tay-to and you say po-tah-to. You choose.

Dublin Potato Salad (Top Photo)
Taste of Home

INGREDIENTS
3 large white potatoes (about 1½ pounds)
2 tablespoons white vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon mustard seed
3/4 teaspoon salt, divided use
2 cups finely shredded cabbage
12 ounces cooked or canned corned beef, cubed
1/4 chopped dill pickle
1/4 cup sliced green onion
1 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup milk

DIRECTIONS
1. Cover potatoes in lightly salted water and boil until tender. Drain, peel and cube.
2. Combine vinegar, sugar, celery seed, mustard seed, and 1/2 teaspoon salt; drizzle over still-warm potatoes. Cover and chill.
3. Just before serving, gently fold in cabbage, corned beef, pickle and onion.
4. Combine mayonnaise, milk and remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt; pour over salad. Gently toss. Serve in cabbage-lined bowl.

Serves 8

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. The evening before, I placed a five-pound piece of corned beef into a crock pot, so that it would be cooked and ready to use by morning.
2. I used shredded cabbage purchased in bags at my local grocery store.
3. This recipe seemed slightly easier to make than the next recipe, because it had fewer ingredients and required less preparation.
4. Of the two recipes, this one yielded a slightly sweeter and creamier potato salad.
5. For my taste buds, this salad required no additional salt. The corned beef brings plenty of sodium to it.
6. This salad tastes better the next day.

Corned Beef Potato Salad (Bottom Photo)
Razzle Dazzle Recipes

INGREDIENTS
Salad Ingredients:
1 can corned beef (the kind you have to open with the attached key) chilled, fat scraped off, and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
3 large potatoes, any kind, about 1½ lbs
4 green onions, minced
1 can (about 1½ C) sauerkraut, drained, rinsed and chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped/diced
1/3 C minced dill pickles
1 small jar diced pimentos (optional, for color)

Dressing Ingredients:
1/2 C low-fat mayo or salad dressing
1 C low-fat sour cream
2 to 4 T spicy brown prepared mustard
1 to 2 T horseradish
1/4 C milk, broth or pickle juice
1/8 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp salt

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine dressing ingredients in a large bowl.
2. Boil whole potatoes in skins until barely tender.
3. Peel and cut into large pieces (2-inches by 2-inches), and place in dressing mixture while still warm. Toss to coat thoroughly.
4. Stir in other ingredients.
5. Refrigerate. Taste and adjust for salt several hours later.
6. Serve cold lettuce. Garnish with cherry tomatoes, sliced

Serves 4 to 6 servings as a main dish

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. I used the same five-pound piece of corned beef that I placed into a crock pot the evening before. I don’t know how the recipe would have tasted with canned corned beef.
2. The 2-inch by 2-inch chunks of potatoes seemed too large, so I cut them smaller.
3. Tasting the salad after adding the minimum amounts of horseradish and mustard, I decided to put in the full amounts.
4. I used the pickle juice from the dill pickle jar.
5. Again, for my taste buds, this salad required no additional salt. The corned beef adds plenty of sodium to it.
6. This salad has a little more crunch, kick, and flavor than the other one. The horseradish and mustard bring out the flavor of the corned beef. It is a less creamy potato salad, though.
7. This salad also tastes better the next day.
8. Finally, did you know that sauerkraut is considered a “belly blaster?” According to Dr. Oz’s website: Why it’s a superfood: Directly translated from German as “sour cabbage,” this traditional fermented food delivers gut-friendly flora that boost digestion and can reduce belly inflammation. Sauerkraut’s signature sour taste comes as the added bacteria ferment the naturally occurring sugars in the cabbage into lactic acid; it should keep for months.

Dr. Oz’s Prescription: Check the label carefully and buy only traditional fermented sauerkraut and not one of the more commercially heat-treated brands (which many are), as that will destroy the beneficial bacteria.

Enjoy!

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Curry-Coconut Shrimp Want curry in a hurry? If that’s the case, try this recipe. With its ease of preparation and subtle coconut and curry flavors, this dish will become a favorite for quick dinners and easy entertaining.

Curry-Coconut Shrimp
Epicurious, courtesy of Ying Chang, Cooking with an Asian Accent

INGREDIENTS
1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk
1½ tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons seeded and finely chopped red bell pepper
1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro leaves
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon curry powder
1½ pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 cups cooked brown rice
4 lemon wedges, for serving
Fresh cilantro sprigs, for garnish, optional

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the coconut milk, fish sauce, lemon juice, bell pepper, minced cilantro, sugar, and curry powder in a 10-inch glass pie plate. Add the shrimp, cover, and marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

2. Bring water to a boil over high heat in a covered steamer or pot large enough to hold the pie plate. Wearing oven mitts, carefully place the pie plate into the steamer. Cover, lower the heat to medium, and steam for 4 to 6 minutes, or until the shrimp are just cooked through.

3. Using oven mitts, carefully lift the lid of the steamer away from you, and remove the pie plate from the steamer. Serve the shrimp over brown rice. Garnish with the lemon wedges and cilantro sprigs, if using.

Makes 4 servings

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. I buy shrimp that are already deveined. I peel them and they are ready to go. Peeled and deveined shrimp are also available, but I save the shells to enrich the flavor of soup stock.

2. Start the rice before you prepare the rest of the ingredients. This allows the rice enough time to steam.

3. How long the shrimp take to cook is dependent on what size shrimp you’re using. You do not want to overcook the shrimp, so I would check the shrimp after 4 minutes. If they still appear translucent and have not curled, let them cook one more minute. Continue to check after every minute. Once they are removed from the heat they will continue to cook a little more.

ENJOY!

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Jjim-Dak: Korean Vegetable Chicken Stew Whether it’s a pot-au-feu from France, a goulash from Hungary, or a moqueca from Brazil, stews from around the world warm the tummy and soothe the soul. From a cookbook that contains recipes from the best Korean restaurants in Los Angeles, comes this easy to make Korean stew. This fiery and fragrant stew will definitely spice up your stew repertoire!

Jjim-Dak – Korean Vegetable Chicken Stew
Discovering Korean Cuisine, edited by Allisa Park

INGREDIENTS
1½ pounds chicken, cleaned and chopped into 2-inch pieces
1 potato, cut into 1-inch slices crosswise
3½ cups water
5 scallions, halved lengthwise and then cut into 4-inch pieces
1/2 large onion, cut into 1/4-inch thick slices
1/4 carrot, peeled and cut diagonally into 1/4-inch pieces
1 jalapeño chile, cut into 1/4-inch rounds
1/4 red bell pepper, seeded, cut into 1/4-inch strips
5  leaves spinach, cut into 2-inch pieces
3 ounces Korean sweet potato vermicelli (dang myun), soaked in warm water for 1 hour
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon red pepper powder
1 tablespoon Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang)
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 tablespoon mirin
2 tablespoons corn syrup
1/4 pack enoki mushrooms, roots trimmed
1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

DIRECTIONS
1. Soak sweet potato vermicelli in warm water.

2. In a large pot (or wok), combine chicken, potato, water, minced garlic, soy sauce, red pepper powder, hot pepper paste, sugar and mirin.

3. Boil over high heat for about 20 minutes with the lid on (or until chicken is fully cooked).

4. Remove the lid and add corn syrup, scallions, onion, carrot, jalapeño chile, and red bell pepper. Quickly mix together and continue cooking for another 5 minutes.

5. Add spinach and prepared sweet potato vermicelli on top and put the lid on (do not mix in). Heat for an additional 2 minutes and then remove from heat.

6. Open the lid and gently mix, then transfer to a serving plate.

7. Put the enoki mushrooms on top and sprinkle on sesame seeds to garnish.

Serving size: 2

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Korean Ingredients Sweet potato vermicelli and the Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang) can be purchased at most Asian markets or ordered online. Here’s a link to a listing of online stores that carry Korean ingredients.

2. Because it didn’t make sense to use just a quarter of a carrot and because I like a lot of vegetables in my stews, I used a whole carrot.

3. I had baby spinach leaves on hand, so I didn’t need to cut them into 2-inch pieces. I used a large handful.

4. In step 3 of the directions, I turned the temperature down to medium, because it had reached a rapid boil. I wanted more time for the flavors to mingle and I didn’t want to overcook the chicken.

5. Not having authentic Korean red pepper powder, I substituted ground red pepper (cayenne pepper). 1 tablespoon of cayenne pepper seemed like a lot of heat to me (along with the jalapeño chile and the Korean hot pepper paste), so I cut it back to 1/2 tablespoon. The recipe still had quite a bit of kick. I’m not sure what the heat difference or flavor difference is between cayenne pepper and Korean red pepper powder, but I’ll try it with the authentic red pepper powder the next time I make it. I’d also recommend adding any heat element to taste.

6. I researched enoki mushrooms and found differing opinions on their preparation. Mushroom growers said to just cut off the root end, but some online “experts” said to run it under water and then cut off the root end. The Korean cookbook said, “Sold in plastic bag. Chop off the roots without removing the bag and discard,” so I ultimately followed the cookbook’s instructions.

7. I buy pre-toasted sesame seeds that I keep in my freezer. Before using, I quickly re-toast the needed amount. Toasting sesame seeds brings out their flavor. To toast sesame seeds, put them in a small sauté/frying pan over medium to medium-high heat. Stir constantly until they are a light golden brown. Pour them on a plate to cool.

8. Although this dish contains sweet potato noodles, I served it with rice. I wanted the rice to soak up every last bit of the delicious sauce!

ENJOY!

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Silken Tofu Chocolate Mousse Want to serve your sweetheart a killer dessert for Valentine’s Day that won’t kill him? Instead, present him with this cool and creamy mousse that’s rich in flavor, but not heavy in saturated fats, cholesterol, and calories. Don’t mention to him that the base of this luscious chocolate-orange treat is silken tofu—he’ll never guess. Before some of you utter, “Eww . . . tofu,” make this dessert for yourself and then recognize that silken tofu, with its smooth texture and neutral taste, makes the perfect base for a healthy mousse. Plus, after you check the nutritional data below and see that this dessert has no cholesterol, only 40 calories from fat, and a mere 1.5 G of saturated fat, it might just become your favorite dessert.

Silken Tofu Chocolate Mousse
The Whole Foods Market Cookbook by Steve Petusevsky

INGREDIENTS
12 ounces silken-style tofu, drained well
1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/3 cup maple syrup (barley malt or rice syrup may be substituted)
1 tablespoon orange zest
1 tablespoon instant coffee granules (decaf or regular)
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
1 ounce almond liqueur (optional)

DIRECTIONS
1. Process the tofu, cocoa powder, maple syrup, orange zest, coffee granules, vanilla, salt, and optional liqueur in the bowl of a food processor or in a blender for 1½ minutes, until smooth.

2. Pour the mousse into wine or champagne glasses or dessert-type serving dishes, and chill overnight.

3. Serve the mousse with fresh orange sections, toasted almonds, or shaved chocolate garnish over the top.

Serves 4

Per Serving:
Calories 240
Calories from fat 40
Calories from saturated fat 15
Protein 13 G
Carbohydrate 35 G
Total Fat 4.5 G
Saturated Fat 1.5 G
Cholesterol 0 MG
Sodium 70 MG

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. In general, but depending on brands, tofu is a good source of calcium. Look for brands in which the tofu has been set with calcium sulfate.

2. Because a rich chocolate flavor is critical to this dessert, use a good quality cocoa powder. I used Sharffen Berger Unsweetened Natural Cocoa Powder.

3. Amaretto is the almond liqueur I used. Rather than add the full amount of liqueur at first, I would add it to taste.

4. Adapt this recipe using other flavors. Raspberry, mint, or coffee liqueur would be interesting variations to the recipe.

5. I filled 3 champagne glasses to the brim with one recipe’s worth of mousse. If I had not filled them to the top, I probably could have gotten 4 servings out of the recipe.

ENJOY!!

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Grilled Pork Kebabs with ginger Molasses Barbecue Sauce“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” Elizabeth Barret Browning did not pen those words while reflecting on food, but for some reason, her words danced through my head as I ate the Grilled Pork Kebabs with Ginger Molasses Barbecue Sauce. Let me count the reasons why I love this recipe. Made from lean pork tenderloin, these kebabs are lower in fat. In fact, in an article written by Jeff Volek, Ph.D, R.D. for Men’s Health, he states, “Pork really is the other white meat. Ounce for ounce, pork tenderloin has less fat than a chicken breast.” In addition, as the complex flavors of the sauce swirled in my mouth, I thought about its versatility and how fabulous it would taste on other grilled meat, particularly salmon, prawns, or chicken. The final reason why I love this kebab recipe focuses on its ease of preparation and its make-ahead convenience. Serve these kebabs with rice pilaf for Valentine’s Day and experience love at first taste.

Grilled Pork Kebabs with Ginger Molasses Barbecue Sauce
Gourmet, August 2003

INGREDIENTS
For Barbecue Sauce:
6 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons ketchup
1½ tablespoons molasses (regular or robust, not blackstrap)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced fresh serrano or other small hot green chile (1 or 2), including seeds
1/2 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt

For Pork:
1 (1-lb) pork tenderloin, trimmed
1/4 teaspoon salt

Special Equipment:
About 30 (8-inch) wooden skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes

DIRECTIONS
1. To make barbecue sauce: Stir together all sauce ingredients in a 1- to 1½-quart heavy saucepan and briskly simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until thickened and reduced to about 1/2 cup, about 3 minutes. Transfer sauce to a medium bowl and cool to room temperature.

2. Put tenderloin on a cutting board. Starting about 5 inches from narrow end of tenderloin and holding a large sharp knife at a 30-degree angle to cutting board, cut a thin slice (1/8 to 1/4 inch thick) from tenderloin, slicing diagonally toward narrow end and cutting through to cutting board. Continue to cut thin slices from tenderloin following same diagonal, starting each consecutive slice closer to wide end. (You will have about 12 slices. Cut any slices more than 2 inches wide in half lengthwise.)

3. Thread 2 skewers, 1 at a time and 1/2 to 1 inch apart, lengthwise through each slice of pork and transfer to a tray lined with plastic wrap.

4. If using a charcoal grill, open vents on bottom of grill, then light charcoal. Charcoal fire is hot when you can hold your hand 5 inches above rack for 1 to 2 seconds. If using a gas grill, preheat burners on high, covered, 10 minutes.

5. Sprinkle pork slices with salt and brush both sides with barbecue sauce, then grill on oiled grill rack, uncovered, turning over once, until just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes total. Discard any leftover sauce.*

6. Cooks’ notes: Barbecue sauce can be made 6 hours ahead and chilled, covered. Kebabs can be prepared 6 hours before grilling (without salt or sauce) and chilled, covered with plastic wrap. If you aren’t able to grill outdoors, cook kebabs in a hot oiled well-seasoned ridged grill pan over moderately high heat.

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. For even cooking, try to cut pork in uniformly thick slices.

2. The spiciness of the sauce can be adjusted by reducing or increasing the amount of minced chile.

3. *I make double the amount of sauce and pour about half of it into a separate bowl to serve alongside the meat or to slather it on the grilled meat prior to serving. Discard the remaining half that was brushed onto the raw meat.

4. These kebabs make hearty appetizers and taste just as good when served at room temperature.

5. I sprinkled toasted sesame seeds on the kebabs and cilantro leaves on the serving plate prior to serving.

ENJOY!

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Spicy Chicken in Lettuce Cups The Chinese year 4712 begins on Friday. As a nod to my Chinese heritage, I decided to make “San Choy Bao” or lettuce cups. Lettuce cups, also referred to as lettuce wraps, can be served as a hearty appetizer or as a light main dish. Pine nuts, added to the tasty stir-fry mixture and sprinkled on top, bring an interesting flavor twist and crunch to these lettuce cups. Gung Hay Fat Choy!

Spicy Chicken in Lettuce Cups
Based on a recipe in Chinatown, a cookbook by Ross Dobson

INGREDIENTS
1 lb 2 oz boneless, skinless chicken thighs, trimmed and cut into chunks
2 tablespoons shaoxing rice wine, divided use
4 small dried shiitake mushrooms
1/2 teaspoon superfine sugar
1/3 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 garlic clove, roughly chopped
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
2 green onions (scallions), white part chopped and green part thinly sliced
2 small red chilies, finely chopped
2 tablespoons pine nuts, divided use
1/4 cup water chestnuts, roughly chopped
8 iceberg lettuce leaves, washed and chilled
Hoisin sauce, to taste
Sweet chili sauce, optional

DIRECTIONS
1. Put the chicken and 1 tablespoon of the rice wine into a food processor and process until the chicken is chopped. Refrigerate for a few hours, or until ready to use.

2. Put the dried mushrooms in a bowl, cover with boiling water and soak for 20-30 minutes. Squeeze out the excess liquid from the mushrooms, then remove and discard the stems and finely chop the caps. Reserve 1/4 cup of the soaking liquid.

3. Combine the sugar, stock, oyster sauce, remaining rice wine and the reserved mushroom soaking liquid in a bowl, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

4. Heat a wok over high heat and add the oil, swirling the oil around to coat the wok. When the oil reaches smoking point, add the garlic, ginger, spring onion whites and chillies and cook for a few seconds.

5. Add the chicken and half the pine nuts and stir-fry for 3-4 minutes, or until the chicken is almost cooked, stirring constantly to break up the chicken.

6. Add the mushrooms and water chestnuts and stir-fry for 1 minute.

7. Add the sauce mixture, pouring it down the side of the wok, and bring to the boil for 2-3 minutes, or until the sauce has almost evaporated.

8. Serve in a bowl, sprinkled with the slivered green onions, the remaining pine nuts, and the lettuce on the side. Assemble these at the table, two per person.

Serves 4 as a starter

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Chicken thighs are preferred over chicken breasts, because chicken breasts tend to be too dry.

2. I ran out of shaoxing rice wine, so I substituted dry sherry.

3. I followed the instructions and grated the ginger, but next time I will just finely mince it.

4. Toast the pine nuts in a skillet on medium-heat until they are a pale golden in color. This brings out the flavor of the nuts. Keep an eye on them while toasting, because they burn easily. I toasted more than called for, because I served it as a topping option, rather than as a garnish. If you don’t like pine nuts, you can substitute unsalted, roasted chopped cashews.

5. As mentioned above, I used the pine nuts as a topping. I also sliced extra green onions to use as a topping, too. Fresh cilantro leaves would also make another flavorful topping.

6. In my opinion, the meat mixture needed more flavor. That was easily solved by adding some hoisin sauce. It can either be added to the meat mixture before serving or you can serve hosin sauce on the side as a condiment. Sweet chili sauce can also be served as a condiment on the side.

ENJOY!

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Chips, Dips and Strips: Healthy Appetizers So what if your favorite football team failed in its attempt to reach the Super Bowl? Plenty of other reasons exist in life for you to throw a get-together with friends! Start the festivities out with mix and match homemade dips, chips, and strips. The exotic flavors of the Cajun Tortilla Chips and the Indian Egg-Roll Strips play nicely with the flavors of the Thai Shrimp Dip and the Hot Bean-and-Cheese Dip—so nicely, in fact, that you won’t even miss the fat in these tasty low-fat appetizers!

Recipes by Jim Fobel for Cooking Light Magazine

Thai Shrimp Dip
INGREDIENTS
1 pound medium shrimp, cooked and peeled
1/4 cup (2 ounces) 1/3-less-fat cream cheese
2 tablespoons light mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons Thai fish sauce or low-sodium soy sauce
1 (12.3-ounce) package reduced-fat firm tofu, drained
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
3 tablespoons minced green onions
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
Cooked and peeled shrimp (optional garnish)
Cilantro sprig (optional garnish)

DIRECTIONS
1. Place the first 3 ingredients in a food processor, and process until minced.
2. Add lime juice, fish sauce, and tofu; pulse until blended.
3. Heat oil in a small skillet over medium heat; sauté ginger and garlic 2 minutes.
4. Add to shrimp mixture, and pulse until combined.
5. Add onions and chopped cilantro, and pulse 3 to 4 times.
6. Spoon into a bowl; cover and chill 1 hour.
7. Garnish dip with additional shrimp and cilantro sprig, if desired.

Yields: 3 cups

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. In this recipe, fish sauce is a more flavorful ingredient choice over low-sodium soy sauce. Fish sauce adds more depth of flavor. I would substitute soy sauce only if you absolutely can’t find/buy fish sauce in your region.

Hot Bean-And-Cheese Dip
INGREDIENTS
1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained and divided
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1 (16-ounce) can pinto beans, rinsed and drained
1 (16-ounce) can fat-free refried beans
1 (4.5-ounce) can green chiles, drained
Cooking Spray
3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
2. Combine 1 cup tomatoes and the next 7 ingredients (1 cup tomatoes through chiles).
3. Spoon tomato mixture into a 1½-quart casserole dish coated with cooking spray.
4. Top with cheese.
5. Bake at 350° for 20 minutes or until cheese is melted. Top with remaining tomatoes.

Yield: 4½ cups

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. The next time I make this I will add a little more hot pepper sauce for additional kick.
2. The combination of the melted cheese and the vegetable spray created a slight ring of oil around the edge of the dip after it was baked. I blotted this excess oil off with a paper towel before serving. Next time I will spray the cooking oil more sparingly or just lightly wipe a little oil with a paper towel on the inside of the dish.

Cajun Tortilla Chips
INGREDIENTS
Cajun Seasoning:
1½ teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper

Chips:
10 (7-inch) flour tortillas, cut into 8 wedges
Cooking spray

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat oven to 375° .
2. To prepare Cajun seasoning, combine first 8 ingredients in a small bowl.
3. To prepare chips arrange the tortilla wedges on 2 baking sheets coated with cooking spray.
4. Coat wedges with cooking spray. Sprinkle 2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning over wedges.
5. Bake chips at 375° for 6 minutes or until crisp.
6. Note: Store remaining Cajun seasoning in an airtight container.

Yield: 80 chips

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. I find it easiest to use a pizza cutter to cut the tortillas into wedges.
2. Since the recipe makes a fair amount of seasoning, I sprinkled it on the tortilla wedges a little more generously than the recipe specified.
3. Instead of spraying cooking oil on the baking sheets, I covered them with parchment paper.
4. My chips took more than double the amount of time to become crisp.

Indian Egg-Roll Strips
INGREDIENTS
Curry seasoning:
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Strips:
10 egg-roll wrappers, each cut lengthwise into 8 strips
Cooking spray

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat over 375°.
2. To prepare curry seasoning, combine first 6 ingredients in a small bowl.
3. To prepare strips, arrange the egg-roll strips on 2 baking sheets coated with cooking spray.
4. Coat strips with cooking spray, and sprinkle 2 teaspoons curry seasoning over strips.
5. Bake strips at 375° for 8 minutes or until crisp.
6. Note: Store remaining curry seasoning in an airtight container.

Yield: 80 strips

LINNELL’S NOTES
1. Again, I lined the baking sheets with parchment paper instead of spraying them with cooking spray.
2. Unlike the Cajun Tortilla Chips, these egg-roll strips brown faster, so monitor them while they bake.
3. I felt my first batch of these were underseasoned, so the next batch I applied the curry seasoning more liberally.

ENJOY!

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